How NOT to be…Facebook, part II

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Mornin’ readers!

So, our last post here on FRR was about Facebook‘s continued foray into making their users not want to use them again. This was in response to the new change that Facebook made during the summer in which they changed their users’ email addresses with that of their very own Facebook email address, whether they wanted it or not.

Not that this was the first time that Facebook as annoyed users, whether it be constantly changing their privacy policies or changing them while erasing previously set up settings that a user had done or the bragging they did about their IPO that didn’t really do so well.

So in this second part, we’ll look at how we as freelancers can avoid doing some of these things that FB insists on doing to the rest of us.

3. Not Caring About Users

As a freelancer, it’s important that you take into account what your client wants. Now, sometimes the client may have some crazy ideas that they want to see done, which is when you should politely request that perhaps that idea is crazy. However, the important thing is always keep their ideas and requests in your head. Not caring about what your client – or users – want can cost you a rep.

4. Making It Impossible for the Client to Change Anything

Here is the big thing with Facebook – every change and implementation they make almost seems purely designed to see how many of their users will actually take the time to change it. Of course, many of the social network’s users actually don’t bother to change things like their privacy settings (which is bad, btw!), however for those who want to make sure that only their friends and families can find them, trying to change anything on Facebook is a hassle and confusing and utterly frustrating.

This might be an issue for those of you who freelance in web design or even programming; if you have designed something that will allow the client to change something – like a web site in which they can log in to access an account – don’t make it so complicated that they aren’t able to do so. In the case of programming, of course there will be sections in which the client shouldn’t have access to, but if it’s something as simple as trying to change their password or even changing the color scheme (if they are able), let it be easy enough for them to do it without them breaking anything.

Facebook isn’t the only big company that’s been making some big mistakes in the last few years. Next, we’ll take a look at how Netflix managed to dig themselves into a hole that nearly buried them, while Sony’s Playstation Network was determined to give out every one of their client’s credit card numbers.

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About Writer 66

Writing since the age of seven, managed to get a job as a copy writer, while enjoying the unsung awesomeness as a creative fan fic writer.

Posted on September 23, 2012, in security, The Business Side and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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